In an unprecedented study, researchers at UNC released findings where they accurately predicted autism in babies.

An article on the website of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill proclaims a first-of-its-kind-study accurately predicts autism in infants.

The study (published Feb. 15 in Nature), is the first to show it is possible to identify which infants – among those with older siblings with autism – will be diagnosed with autism at 24 months of age.

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According to the article, it has been impossible to identify those at ultra-high risk for autism prior to 24 months of age, which is the earliest time when the hallmark behavioral characteristics of ASD can be observed and a diagnosis made in most children.

We haven’t had a way to detect the biomarkers of autism before the condition sets in and symptoms develop,” said senior author Joseph Piven, M.D., the Thomas E. Castelloe Distinguished Professor of Psychiatry at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. “Now we have very promising leads that suggest this may in fact be possible.” 

With autism in babies on the rise, new parents are especially concerned and looking for ways to diagnose autism babies even earlier. It is estimated that 1 in 68 children develop autism in the United States, but that number increases drastically (as high as 20%) for infants with older siblings who are autistic.

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People with Autism Spectrum Disorder (or ASD) have characteristic social deficits and demonstrate a range of ritualistic, repetitive and stereotyped behaviors. There are about 3 million people with autism in the United States and tens of millions around the world.



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Sami Cone

Best-Selling Author & Speaker

Sami Cone is the best-selling author of "Raising Uncommon Kids", is known as the "Frugal Mom" on Nashville's top-rated talk show "Talk of the Town" and educates over a million listeners every day on her nationally syndicated "Family Money Minute". She is proud to call Nashville home with her husband, Rick, and their two ‘tweenage' children.



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